Schiavo dies. She was preceded in death by her husband's sense of decency and judicial compassion and mercy

Terri Schiavo did what people who have been denied food and water for two weeks tend to do– she passed away this morning. I’ll link to the FOX News obit, since we saw the CBS one yesterday.

If you think this is over, think again, The debate is only beginning.

Okay Michael… the rest of the money is yours. Go away and try to live with yourself. As for the courts, they’ll continue to fine people for displacing eagles, jail those who starve dogs to death, and gladly allow the murder of the handicapped under the guise of “rule of law”.

Now, this situation will probably set the precedent that was the benchmark of this case: The most useless among us deciding who is useless.

Schiavo dies. She was preceded in death by her husband’s sense of decency and judicial compassion and mercy

Terri Schiavo did what people who have been denied food and water for two weeks tend to do– she passed away this morning. I’ll link to the FOX News obit, since we saw the CBS one yesterday.

If you think this is over, think again, The debate is only beginning.

Okay Michael… the rest of the money is yours. Go away and try to live with yourself. As for the courts, they’ll continue to fine people for displacing eagles, jail those who starve dogs to death, and gladly allow the murder of the handicapped under the guise of “rule of law”.

Now, this situation will probably set the precedent that was the benchmark of this case: The most useless among us deciding who is useless.

CBS posts premature Schiavo obit– Obit for CBS News on the way

Some people are angered that a pre-written CBS obituary for Terri Schiavo was accidentally made public. The obit, captured before it could be deleted, was then posted on the website of syndicated talk show host Glenn Beck.

All news outlets have obituaries written for all sorts of celebrities, dignitaries, and other people in the public eye. That’s nothing new. Heck, I’ve even planned ahead for the death of CBS and other network news programs by writing this eulogy I plan to deliver at their funeral.

Howell-ing at the Kennedys: Late Senator best remembered for hilarious Ted joke

Former Alabama Senator, Democrat Howell Heflin, died yesterday at the age of 83.

The thing I best remember about ol’ Howell wasn’t anything to do with legislation. In the 1980’s a tabloid newspaper published a picture taken through a telephoto lens of Ted Kennedy out on a boat in the ocean in flagrante delicto with a female companion.

Later, Heflin commented on the photo. “Looks like Ted’s changed his position on offshore drillin’.”

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Speaking of Kennedys, Ted’s former wife and drinkin’ buddy, Joan, was found laying on a sidewalk in Boston, suffering from a concussion and a broken shoulder. Joan has had severe bouts with alcoholism over the years, and lost all of them. You know you’ve got a problem when you’re married to Ted, and he’s the designated driver.

Welcome to new readers, along with some Bible study

From Brian, a “Powers That Be” newbie:

A friend of mine got me into reading your blog, and I have to say I’m glad she did. Even if I don’t always agree with your posts, they are very entertaining, and provide me with an intelligent view of things from the conservative end of the spectrum.

In any case, I wanted to comment on your post (next post down) about Robert Harlan. I am not an overly religious person… however this situation doesn’t make sense to me. If the Pledge of Allegiance states “One nation Under God…”, and when you testify you swear an oath of honesty on the Bible, why can’t we use the Bible to decide a criminal’s fate? Now I’m not saying it’s not poetic justice that will allow this man to feel some of the pain of his victim, I just don’t understand why he can’t feel all the pains. Just my thoughts. Keep up the good work.

It seems to me that almost all of our laws, in some way, shape or form, spawned from the Ten Commandments. It’s fun to watch the left try to deny that, as if it’s just some big coincidence.

Speaking of the far left and the Bible, I’ve discovered 22 things about the Good Book that drives them nuts (aside from juries using it during deliberations). Those 22 things the left can’t stand about the Bible are:

1) Moses parted the Red Sea without first performing an environmental impact study.

2) Jesus gave a Sermon on the Mount where he talked of giving to the poor, and spoke out against greed, and all without charging attendees $300 per ticket. (Barbra Streisand only).

3) The term “The Three Wise Men” is insensitive to the intellectually challenged. That should be changed to the “Trio of educationally advantaged amateur astronomers.”

4) Instead of gold, frankincense and myrrh, they should have brought hummus, incense and a representative from Child Protective Services.

5) The Virgin Mary didn’t first meet with consultants from Planned Parenthood.

6) Ten plagues and still not a single person thought of nationalizing health care?

7) Adam didn’t ask Eve for verbal as well as written consent before touching her.

8) Of course Cain killed Abel. He was obviously suffering either from bipolar disorder, low blood sugar, emotional abuse as a child, or societal neglect.

9) “The trials of Job” were nothing. Try getting a job with nothing but a masters degree in Norwegian Art History – that’s a test!

10) Too bad Greenpeace didn’t have their own ark so they could have rammed Noah’s Ark. You just know that, after the flood, Noah sold those animals to the circus.

11) The destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah could have easily been prevented if they would have passed hate-crime legislation sooner.

12) Jesus is one of the greatest teachers in history, but isn’t a member of the National Education Association. In other words, God uses scab labor.

13) David slew Goliath simply because he was unfortunate enough to have been stricken with gigantism.

14) “The Last Supper” didn’t offer an option for people on gluten-free diets, and the fat content on the food was not labeled.

15) The part about Jonah and the whale becoming entangled in tuna nets is conveniently passed over in the Old Testament.

16) God should have spent the seventh day not resting, but rather going around putting warning stickers on all potentially dangerous, really pointy things.

17) What’s the big deal about Nebuchadnezzar spending seven years ingesting grass? Heck, Woody Harrelson’s done it longer than that.

18) The Bible mentions nothing about obtaining the necessary permits to build the Tower of Babel.

19) People lived to be hundreds of years old without prescription-drug coverage? I don’t think so.

20) Jesus turned water into wine, which was not very mindful of those who happened to be teetering on the brink of plunging down the stairs of their 12-step program.

21) Of all the wealth possessed by King Solomon, the amount he donated to environmental causes: $0.

And 22? People can find salvation without their assistance.

Jesus Saves! (literally)

Robert Harlan, the man, and I use the term very loosely, who raped a woman for two hours before shooting her was saved by the Good Book, in a roundabout way.

The jury in his trial sentenced him to die, but that sentence was overturned after it was discovered that jurors consulted the bible during deliberations.

Apparently you’re not supposed to do that. If that’s the case all around, it does bring up the question of what would have happened if the man was acquitted by a jury who consulted the bible. The Colorado Supreme Court probably wouldn’t have viewed the juries reading habits as harshly (unless one of the justices found out that the man was planning to move to their neighborhood).

My brother-in-arms Conservatives are in a tizzy over this, but, I differ, because this is incredibly bad news for this animal. Now that Harlan is out of death row and back in general population, there’s a very good chance he’ll get plenty of opportunities to know exactly what he put his victim through… on many, many hellish and most uncomfortable occasions.

If there could be a greater example of “an eye for an eye”, I don’t know what it could be. Maybe the Bible is still winning out here.

Wallyworld gets some competition in "Holyland"

A businesswoman in Britain wants to start a biblical theme park. Andrea Webster is asking for £144 each from a million Christians so she can build it.

If you can’t afford to donate, she only asks that you pray for success. If you attend “Holyland”, and if not enough people donated, then pray like crazy that God instructed the underpaid, overworked, disgruntled park staff to secure the bolts on the rails of the “Corkscrew to Heaven” before you’re strapped in.

I’m not sure about the marketing possibilities here. Even a staunch Christian will probably cringe at the idea of a place where everything is a “win-win” situation. For example, an exhilarating rollercoaster ride brought to a successful completion is a “rush”, and the same ride falling off the tracks and plunging four stories is viewed as assisting two dozen lucky patrons in achieving their glorious “eternal reward.”

Wallyworld gets some competition in “Holyland”

A businesswoman in Britain wants to start a biblical theme park. Andrea Webster is asking for £144 each from a million Christians so she can build it.

If you can’t afford to donate, she only asks that you pray for success. If you attend “Holyland”, and if not enough people donated, then pray like crazy that God instructed the underpaid, overworked, disgruntled park staff to secure the bolts on the rails of the “Corkscrew to Heaven” before you’re strapped in.

I’m not sure about the marketing possibilities here. Even a staunch Christian will probably cringe at the idea of a place where everything is a “win-win” situation. For example, an exhilarating rollercoaster ride brought to a successful completion is a “rush”, and the same ride falling off the tracks and plunging four stories is viewed as assisting two dozen lucky patrons in achieving their glorious “eternal reward.”

The Monday plug and a couple other things to start the week

This week’s column is about Campaign Finance Reform as it will someday apply to the Internet. What will be known as the years of the “McCain-Feingold rush” will be an interesting battle. Read about it in “Panning for gold in cyberspace.”

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Other stuff…

At the end of regulation play of Saturday night’s Michigan State/Kentucky game, Wildcat player Patrick Sparks hit what looked like a three-pointer to tie the game. Officials delayed play while they reviewed whether or not Sparks’ foot was on the line.

While the five-minute review dragged on, CBS enhanced and enlarged the video, showing that, just as the officials later ruled, Sparks had indeed made a three-point shot.

Too bad CBS didn’t use that “zoom and examine” technology on those National Guard documents a while back. It could have saved Rather’s reputation.

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Many Democrats applaud the courts ruling in favor of Terri Schiavo’s so-called “husband” and chastize Republican legislation to save her while saying Jeb Bush has no authority or right to go against the courts and remove her from the hospice. Some of these were the same Democrats who praised Janet Reno for defying Florida courts and removing Elian Gonzales from a Miami home and sending him back to Castro-land. How could that be? John Fund has a good explanation.

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If dancing around a pole becomes the exercise fad it could be, get ready to see Chuck Norris and Christy Brinkley hawking the “Ab Stripper” on every cable station in the country.

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Michael Jackson’s playing the race card. Big mistake. He should be playing the sex card. Juries are far more lenient on chicks.

A quick Sunday sports break: Skip down a post if you don't like basketball

Sunday night’s double overtime victory by Michigan State over Kentucky was nearly enough to make me forgive Kansas for screwing my brackets on the first weekend of March Madness… a loss that means for sure I’ll not win a pot of what will probably amount to dozens of dollars.

MSU’s on a roll, and plays N. Carolina in the Final Four next Saturday. Prediction: MSU 81, N. Carolina 76.

Thankfully, the Spartans made it past Duke on Friday, so there was no repeat of the infamous 1999 campus riot. Living a couple of miles from campus at the time, I could nearly read by the light of the burning cars. Now, since I’m over 30 miles removed, potential rioters should forget about the need for a repeat of that episode… I own a lamp now and don’t need the light. Thanks anyway.