JunkScience.com is on their 10th year of debunking those who use scare tactics to forward various agendas. In honor of their ten years in service, Steven Malloy has put together a piece entitled “The top ten junk science stories of the past decade“.

Many on this list will bring back fond memories. The list starts with Dioxin, which contains this hilarious paragraph:

Keying off Ben & Jerry’s claim on its ice cream packages that “there is no safe exposure to dioxin,” we tested Ben & Jerry’s ice cream and found that a single serving contained about 200 times the dioxin that the Environmental Protection Agency says is “safe” – and who’s afraid of Ben & Jerry’s?

The list ends with “the mother of all junk science stories, global warming.

I’ve always been somewhat fascinated by those who are getting nervous to the point of dysentery, including of course Al Gore and Laurie David.

To sign on and think that global warming is a threat to life itself involves the ability to find the following completely believable::

“Here’s your local forecast: One hundred years from today, due to the fact that Bush did not sign the Kyoto Protocol, the polar ice caps will be melted, and the Gulf Stream will have little or no circulation causing temps to actually drop in Europe to 11 degrees below today’s average. Africa and South America will be 12 degrees hotter than they are now, and three hurricanes (Charles, Dabney, and Dubya) will simultaneously strike Florida and Louisiana. Your weather for this coming weekend? Your guess is as good as mine.”

Meteorology, specifically climatology as it concerns global warming, seems to be one of those rare sciences for which the percentage of accuracy of predictions rises as the distance from the date in question increases.

To buy into this scientific convenience takes the same blind confidence required to believe an archer who tells you he can put an arrow through a soda can at 500 yards – the same person who you’ve noticed can’t hit a bail of hay from 10 feet away.

Ask somebody with night sweats over global warming what the world will look like in 100 years if the United States doesn’t sign on to the Kyoto Protocol, and you’ll be drawn a gloomy, and very specific, picture of our final days. Then ask them what the overnight low will be in Paducah two weeks from Thursday, and you’ll get an unresponsive stare.

That’s why I tend to be skeptical, but JunkScience.com helps add more fuel to the fire– a fire which, ironically, cools off the global warming theory.


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