Barbra Streisand is having a farewell tour… again. This time, however, it looks as if tickets, which are upwards of $1,500, are selling about as well as Rolex watches in Bangladesh. Why?

To paraphrase Abe Lincoln: “You can fool some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of the time , but the odds that those you can fool all the time will be able to cough up a thousand dollars a ticket on more than one occasion are slim and none.”

From the Detroit News:

Years from now, Barbra Streisand may not have a lot from fond memories of her upcoming farewell tour. If ticket sales are any indication, very few people will have fond memories for that matter, because no one will be there. Blame it on prices as high as $800, including service fees, but fans aren’t buying up seats for what Streisand is calling her swan song. At the Palace of Auburn Hills, where Streisand is scheduled to perform Oct. 18, fewer than 3,000 tickets have been sold, the New York Post reports.

 Palace spokespeople could not confirm the latter. Another issue, according to the Post, is Streisand’s refusal to say how much of the proceeds she’s donating to the Streisand Foundation for environmental, educational and women’s health organizations, making it difficult for ticket buyers to write the show off on their taxes.

Couple that with people who are actually considering suing Streisand because they paid top dollar for what was billed as her “farewell concert” a few years ago, and Barbra could find out that “people who overcharge people are the most sued people in the world.”

If you paid thousands of dollars to see Barbra Streisand, you and money don’t belong together anyway, and these cases should be thrown out of court should they be brought. Paying a small fortune to see Babs qualifies you for a financial Darwin award. It’s true – a fool and his money will eventually want to see one of Barbra’s farewell tours.

Barbra Streisand is a fascinating yet somewhat typical liberal case study. A champion of the poor, and fighter against corporate greed (any corporation except “Babs Inc.” and her record label), Babs charges a small fortune for a ticket to one of her concerts, keeps most of the money, and gives the rest to liberal political candidates who are also self-described champions of the poor and fighters against corporate greed. The poor, of course, see none of the money (not to mention none of the concert), and Streisand skips on to the next city, a couple million dollars richer, to “help” more poor people. At Streisand’s ticket prices, after thousands of people shell out thousands of dollars, there are more poor people than before Babs’ arrival in town, so it’s a self-perpetuating cause.

Look for Barbra to alter her approach a bit, knowing that the cat is out of the bag concerning the people she cares deeply about who can’t afford to see her concerts. Babs may add a bit of “State of the Union” flair. On the coming tour, President Streisand may have a couple of “special guests” in a small section of seats who are poor, or can’t afford prescription meds, or have been stricken with mild first-degree burns from global warming. They’re introduced, everybody claps, and then conveniently forgets to invite them to the post-concert party.

But I’m being pessimistic. Here’s the reason Barbra’s touring, from the horse’s mouth:

“The increasingly urgent need for private citizen support to combat dangerous climate change, along with education and health issues was the prime reason I decided to tour again. This will allow me to direct funds and awareness to causes that I care deeply about.”

Climate change? I’m sure what could be thousands of people driving SUV’s to an arena to see a singer who came in via jet will help diminish global warming.

Health issues? How much medicine could $2,500 invested in two Babs tickets buy for an elderly person?

Education? Well, ticket sales are way down for Streisand compared to previous tours, so maybe she’s making a dent on the public education front.

Many call Streisand a “limousine liberal,” but she’s just one of the many walking oxymorons who inhabit the entertainment industry – the wealthy bankrupt, the mansioned homeless, the environmentalist polluters, the fantasy-world realists, the gated-neighborhood communers with nature, and the “I’m on my fifth ‘farewell tour’” bunch who go into the honey pot once too often and eventually get stuck.


Note: If you’re seeing only this post, the entire blog can be accessed at


Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.