Talk about all your friends rushing to your defense. What do you want to bet that this turns into a constitutional crisis:

Federal agents arrested Charles Rust-Tierney, the former president of the Virginia chapter of the ACLU, Friday in Arlington for allegedly possessing child pornography.

According to a criminal complaint obtained by ABC News, Rust-Tierney allegedly used his e-mail address and credit card to subscribe to and access a child pornography website.

It’s no wonder that a few years ago the ACLU took such offense to H.R. 4623, the “Child Obscenity and Pornography Prevention Act of 2002,” which passed in June of that year. In a letter to Reps. Lamar Smith and Robert Scott, the ACLU wrote that H. R. 4623 violated the Constitution by attempting to outlaw “virtual child pornography,” where no real child was used in the production of the material.

In other words, if you made a movie featuring Max Headroom’s son engaged in a furious backwoods throwdown with Jimmy Neutron in the digital adaptation of Brokeback Mountain, this would be “free speech” and not child pornography according to the ACLU.

So you see, it’s there in the Bill of Rights: You can’t be deprived of life, liberty, or virtual kiddie porn without fair representation by (if not participation in) the ACLU.

Too bad for Charles Rust-Tierney that his pals were unsuccessful in their lobby effort, or he might be able to get off the hook on the “virtual” technicality. I’m sure they’ll come up with some other creative defense though, such as Bush’s illegal cyber-tapping program.

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