Census time is upon us, and, predictably, the questions are getting more intrusive and personal. The Census is the government’s new way around our constitutional right to privacy, because, hey, the Census is required by the Constitution — so they just add a bunch of nosy questions under the guise of “ensuring fair distribution of government funds” and voila! Suddenly the government has generated quite the personal dossier without violating our rights.

Here’s a short story about just one couple’s Census encounter:

Springport residents Bill and Martha Holland, both 70 years old, received an ACS form about three weeks ago, but are struggling to understand why their responses are necessary and required by law.

“They keep getting more and more personal,” Martha Holland said. “It’s really getting deep.”

She was surprised by the question asking her how many toilets are in her home and how much her water bill was. The ACS also asks in-depth questions about subjects such as family dynamics, education, ancestry, employment and disability.

The survey is necessary and required by law because the government relies on the information to decide how $300 billion is spent across the nation, said Muriel Jackson, a media specialist for the U.S. Census Bureau.
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The Hollands received a phone call from the Census Bureau nearly two weeks after receiving the survey asking them why they had not filled it out and returned it yet.
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Anyone who refuses to answer the ACS could be fined up to $100 and receive phone calls and possibly even a home visit to get the answers. Those who willfully give false answers could be fined up to $500, according to Title 13 of the United States Code.

And to think that these “laws” requiring us to give up more and more details about our personal lives are put into place to a great degree by a bunch of people who think that the idea of wire-tapping suspected terrorists is an affront to the concept of civil liberties.

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