We all hear about the quest for “common ground” these days, but what happens when it’s actually reached? Most importantly, what happens after “common ground” is found? History is fraught with lessons on this.

As the media and others laud Barack Obama’s passionate defense of just about every place except America and Israel in his quest for “peace through weakness,” I can’t help but recall similar accolades that were heaped upon Neville Chamberlain 71 years ago.

Life Magazine has a “never before seen photos of Hitler” feature, and below is one, with the caption:

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If you can’t read it, the caption says: British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain walks past a Nazi honor guard on the way to a meeting with Adolph Hitler in 1938. After the meeting, Chamberlain famously declared that the agreement he had struck with the German Fuhrer meant “peace in our time” — but subsequent events showed that he merely whetted Hitler’s appetite by handing over a strategically critical part of Czechoslovakia during their negotiations.

Knowing that history often comes full-circle if we allow it to (by forgetting the lessons of history or making the grave error of believing “it’ll turn out differently this time”), the above photo and caption is just one reason why I’m hesitant to start dancing when leaders of free nations who “reach out” and seriously negotiate with people whose definition of “common ground” is a split between them getting the land they want, and with you occupying the rest, provided its a cemetery.

Is Obama helping bring peace by striving for the “common ground” that you cannot have unless one side offers concessions (and which side do you think that will be?), or is he simply whetting an aggressors appetite because they’re aware of the former? That’s a rhetorical question by the way.

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