nullShepard Fairey, the “artist” who designed the famous Obama poster that has since popped up in different forms all over the place, had admitted to lying in court about which of the AP’s copyrighted photos he used as the model for the “Hope” poster that became a symbol of the Obama campaign.

But Fairey and the Associated Press proved last year that they have a lot in common: Both went all out to get Barack Obama elected. It’s upon these common values that they must build.

Since a main tenet of Obamian political philosophy is mandatory voluntary service to the less fortunate, and a crucial element of this tenet is the ability to transfer wealth from the well-to-do (anybody with a job) over to the less fortunate (anybody who can’t get a job because the former group is hogging all the jobs) with or without their approval and without regard to whether or not it’s constitutional — wouldn’t it be more appropriate for the Associated Press to end their greedy “that’s copyrighted!” claim and just let Mr. Fairey use their image and reap benefits from it?

After all, Fairey most certainly could use the money and exposure, and the AP can no-doubt afford to help fulfull Obama’s vision of economic stimulus “spreading the wealth around.” And why beat on Shepard Fairey for this “theft,” AP? How dare you! Shepard Fairey is one of the best examples of Barack Obama-style “hope and change” that is practicing today, so leave him alone! Just consider Fairey’s use of your photo a “public option” for a struggling artist and all will be right with the world.

The Associated Press demonstrated a laughable level of pro-Obama bias during the campaign last year, which makes it easy for me to be of the opinion that their photographs should only be protected legally the day that I can also copyright and gain legal protection for my paycheck.

Frankly, I wish people would take it easy on the Hope artist. You try growing up with that last name and see how normal you turn out.

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