Huh? Yeah, that’s what I thought too.

That title may seem harsh and not make sense in the real world, but I couldn’t think of any other way to word this kind of madness:

More than 40 lawmakers vowed to oppose the final healthcare bill if the House language on abortion is not removed.

Reps. Diana DeGette (Colo.) and Louise Slaughter (N.Y.) led the group of Democrats in writing to Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) threatening to withhold support for a final conference report if it strictly prohibits federal funding for abortion services.

“Slaughter” … insert your own tastelessly appropriate joke here.

And what is one of the main justifications used to keep federally funded abortion in the Obamacare bill? “The infant mortality rate in the U.S. is too high.” I heard at least one Democrat during the House debate — I don’t recall which one — speaking of the high infant mortality rate in the U.S. as if America were a third-world toilet. That assumption alone is a big pile of Pelosi, but that aside, it’s how Dems plan to help lower the infant mortality rate that is most perplexing.

The Stupak Amendment has caused a great rift among those who otherwise would support the healthcare bill by causing a division between pro-abortion socialists and anti-abortion socialists.

The irony here is that many of those who support stripping the Stupak Amendment from the health care bill are those who are the most loudly harping about America’s infant mortality rate (what’s the infant mortality rate at an abortion clinic?).

Do these liberal members of Congress know what does have a dramatic effect in dropping the infant mortality rate? A drop in the abortion rate — and for more than just the obvious reason.

Demanding federal funding for abortion while demagoging the infant mortality rate is like calling for funding a match and lighter fluid handout in order to bring about a decline in arson.

Also, before believing all the horrible “data” about the high infant mortality rate in the United States, remember this:

It’s shaky ground to compare U.S. infant mortality with reports from other countries. The United States counts all births as live if they show any sign of life, regardless of prematurity or size. This includes what many other countries report as stillbirths. In Austria and Germany, fetal weight must be at least 500 grams (1 pound) to count as a live birth; in other parts of Europe, such as Switzerland, the fetus must be at least 30 centimeters (12 inches) long. In Belgium and France, births at less than 26 weeks of pregnancy are registered as lifeless. And some countries don’t reliably register babies who die within the first 24 hours of birth. Thus, the United States is sure to report higher infant mortality rates.

And in the liberal halls of Congress, a fetus must first vote Democrat before it counts as a live human being.

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