Downloading, Redistributing Bono’s Property Against His Will is Bad; Same Rules Don’t Apply to Your Property

These entertainers who back all manner of government theft from the paychecks of the rest of us to finance whatever their causes du jour are but who throw hissy fits when their “property” is pilfered never cease to crack me up.

Bono is the latest:

Irish rock star Bono called Sunday for tougher controls over the spread of intellectual property over the Internet, arguing that file swiping and sharing hurt creators of cultural products.

“The only thing protecting the movie and TV industries from the fate that has befallen music and indeed the newspaper business is the size of the files,” the lead singer of the band U2 wrote in an op-ed piece in The New York Times.

Aww… don’t like your property being stolen and re-distributed? Me neither, Bono. Glad to see it irritates U,2.

The “arts” crowd, to a great degree, loses my sympathy on the illegal download and file-sharing issue.

Bono, for example, calls for America to send billions of dollars per year to the world’s poor — and we do (well, we send it, but it doesn’t always get there). Other “artists” call for national health care, etc. That money has to come from somewhere — and in most cases the government must download it from our paychecks.

I consider our paychecks to be our intellectual property. The money a welder earns is because he or she knows how to weld — it’s their intellectual property in a sense. Somebody paid them for their talents or skills, just like somebody who bought a U2 CD. Who is Bono to tell the American government that they should reach in to that person’s paycheck, download their property without compensation, and distribute it around the world?

How come it’s okay to freely re-distribute the money taxpayers worked hard to earn but not the music U2 worked hard to create? In other words, I’ll give a damn about Bono’s property when he starts giving a damn about yours and mine.