Carefully targeted bribes weren’t getting enough votes to pass the health care sham, so now the White House has decided that the only way to be fair about it is to make the bribes available to whatever member of Congress the Obama administration deems worthy:

WASHINGTON — The White House is backing down from efforts to drop “sweetheart” deals poisoning health care legislation as House Budget Committee Democrats meet Monday to craft a “fix-it” bill that does not yet have a price tag.

In a new take on its policy, White House top strategist David Axelrod said President Obama only objects to state-specific arrangements, such as an increase in Medicaid funding for Nebraska, ridiculed as the “cornhusker kickback.”

But instead of dropping them, the concept behind those deals could be widened so that all states benefit.

Though White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs last week singled out state-specific deals as items Obama wanted removed, two powerful committee chairman, Democratic Sens. Max Baucus of Montana and Chris Dodd of Connecticut, have convinced the White House that the arguments being applied for special offers could be expanded to other states where similar circumstances arise.

That “similar circumstance” will be that it’s okay to use our money to bribe a member of Congress if he or she is still on the fence on Obamacare.

Oh, and for those of you keeping score at home, the term “bribe” has been replaced by “special offer.” Please make a note of it.

Update: CBS News’ Bob Schieffer says the White House might have to waterboard Dems to get them to pass the bill. Pelosi will deny she ever heard that.

Update II: “The Mile Bribe Club”:

The president invited Reps. Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio) and Martha Fudge (D-Ohio) aboard Air Force One for his flight Monday to Ohio, where the president will hold a townhall on healthcare. Kucinich represents the Cleveland suburbs where Obama will be speaking.

Both lawmakers are liberals who are upset that the bill does not go far enough to crack down on insurance companies. Kucinich has said he is a “firm no,” while Fudge is undecided. The flight will give the president an opportunity to press the Ohioans to vote for final passage.

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