At a townhall in New Jersey yesterday, a whiny teacher who could use a few weeks at one of Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move” boot camps complained about the state’s education budget and how little money she makes and how she’s not compensated for her education and blah blah blah WAAAAHHHH! (violins, pity party).

Governor Christie’s response? “Maybe you should find another job then.” Many in the crowd applauded.

If Christie would have followed up with “You sound pretty stressed out — just wait a week or so and you’ll have the entire summer off with pay to think about how unfairly compensated you are” he would have scored some bonus points.

Can we run this guy for president yet?

(h/t JWF)

Comments

13 Responses to “Chris Christie Takes Teacher to School”

  1. Joyanna Adams on May 26th, 2010 7:48 pm

    It's amazing what these poor teachers can complain about…they are NOT teaching our children up to standards, and yet, they are getting paid big salaries, and get off at 3…with summers off…have interns do homework, and get free computers, and much of the time, free educations, nice pensions, great health care…and most of them are, single moms.

    And what's sad is that most of THEM have no clue, just how really uneducated they are.

    Is it any wonder they want their easy life to continue?

    And with Tenure, they never have to fear again…ever. Thanks for the post. And yes, this guy is great.

  2. pcs on May 26th, 2010 8:27 pm

    As a former teacher I can tell you that that "summer off" thing is a myth. In the early years you are working on your master's, which is required for continued certification, and then other classes for continued certification.

  3. Nanny on May 26th, 2010 8:36 pm

    There are some good teachers left but for the most part they are just paid propagandists for their unions/democrats. I am sick and tired of them whining about not enough money. Almost every school district in Michigan – 70 to 80% of their budgets go to teacher salaries/benefits/retirement. Taxpayers are done listening to the whining.

  4. Doug on May 26th, 2010 7:40 pm

    This crap's been going on since I can even remember as a kid in school… SOME (not all) teachers piss and moan about their workload, salary, summer classes, etc… as if they didn't know that going in (and if they didn't know, they shouldn't be teaching, because it means they're morons).

    There are excellent teachers, and there are lousy teachers, and both knew what they were getting into when they entered the educational field. If the excellent teachers want to know why the shitty teachers are compensated at the same level and want to complain about it, they should start with their union, because that's where the problem has taken strong root.

    I know some teachers, and, even with any summer classes, etc… all I know is that they get a hell of a lot more time off than almost any other full-time career I'm aware of — and it's not like they're making minimum wage.

  5. Mark1957 on May 26th, 2010 10:15 pm

    Many teachers here in the VA. ,MD., D.C. area make close to $100,000 per year. Nearly every union contract in the area calls for automatic, annual salary increases for teachers, 15-20 paid sick and personal days for teachers every year, generous buyout plans of unused sick days, expensive health insurance funded almost completely by schools, paid leave time for teachers to conduct union business, "overage" pay for teachers with an extra kid or two in their classrooms, and many other perks. Cry me a river.

  6. Doug on May 26th, 2010 8:34 pm

    One more thing… the "I have to keep going to school to keep pace" thing gets old from some teachers… there are a lot of professions where those in them have to take classes or training seminars to keep up with the times/techniques (doctors, accountants, lawyers, nurses, engineers… list goes on). Those professions however have to do their extra training usually after work or on the weekends… they don't get to substitute their job for their training for an entire summer.

  7. OK_Loyalist on May 26th, 2010 11:47 pm

    Christie railed on a journalist last week too. His favorite song must be "Tell It Like It Is", as he seems to sing it whenever he can. LOL

  8. Mark1957 on May 27th, 2010 10:39 am

    HA !! it turns out that the teacher actually earns $86K in salary !!!!
    What a lying douchebag.!!!
    http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/blogs/b

  9. Nanny on May 27th, 2010 1:48 pm

    Cry me a river is right!

  10. Doug on May 27th, 2010 2:53 pm

    it turns out that the teacher actually earns $86K in salary !!!!

    Classic! Lesson to the school unions: If you're going to use teachers to astroturf, at least have them use fake names so there's no paper trail.

  11. Nick on May 28th, 2010 5:08 pm

    Nanny, always good for the ignorant hateful nutjob POV.

  12. Margaret on June 5th, 2010 7:03 pm

    Wow. Where is that? Let me teach there. I've been teaching in VA for six years, haven't had a salary increase in three years, make only 42K and take home 33K after taxes, retirement, and health insurance. I spend approximately 2K of my own money on my class (85% of which is nondeductible). I make a livable wage but definitely don't live in luxury. Unions are a huge problem, administration is a huge problem, and parent stakeholders are a huge problem. Approximately 50% of our population actually pays taxes, the overwhelming majority of parents in my district don't pay taxes. They also expect that the teacher/education system should bear the total load for raising/educating their child. Often, these students create huge behavioral problems that derail the education of the whole class. Therefore, we have people with no financial or time contribution to the education of their child then making strong claims about the product they receive and sometimes suing the system. The end result is that non-investing stakeholders contribute to the bureaucratic nightmare that is the education system in America. As we know, people highly value the things that cost them something. What I'm saying here is that we need comprehensive reform which doesn't lay all blame for failures at the foot of the teacher but addresses union issues, parent issues, and bureaucratic issues. Otherwise, we could reform teacher salaries and cut funding all day and still end up with an unbalanced and ineffective system.

  13. Walt on September 10th, 2010 1:38 pm

    I don't know how it works in New Jersey, but in Nevada teachers aren't paid for nothing in the summer. The pay scale is based on a 180 day schedule, meaning they get paid for 9 months of work. However, their salary is spread out over 12 months so that they receive a paycheck every month. As for teachers getting to go home at three, that's simply not the case. Most teachers are in front of students for nearly the entire day. That means that teachers will need to spend a few hours after coming home each evening or a good chunk of their weekend preparing lessons and grading assignments. To say that teachers go home at three as if they are done working when the kids aren't around is ridiculously ignorant. The sad fact is that most people couldn't handle a classroom full of kids for five minutes. Everyone thinks they can teach because they grew up in school. It's a thankless job, where you're denigrated often. The great irony in all these negative posts is that some teacher taught you had to read, write, type, form an opinion, etc. The fact that you can read this article and post an opinion is thanks to teachers. No one came out of the womb knowing how to do all these things, and most likely your parents didn't teach them to you.

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