Obama’s Youth in Indonesia: The Transfer of Wealth Mentality Started Early

The New York Times published an article about President Obama’s days as a boy in Indonesia.

The nanny must have been the one who taught Obama how to throw a baseball:

His nanny was an openly gay man who, in keeping with Indonesia’s relaxed attitudes toward homosexuality, carried on an affair with a local butcher, longtime residents said. The nanny later joined a group of transvestites called Fantastic Dolls, who, like the many transvestites who remain fixtures of Jakarta’s streetscape, entertained people by dancing and playing volleyball.

No wonder everybody took a pass whenever Barry’s dad invited them over for burgers. “The butcher is delivering some meat” took on a whole new meaning in that neighborhood. But I digress.

If you’re wondering if “transfer of wealth” politics was something Obama picked up in college, think again — he leaned that way early on:

One time, recalled the elder son, Slamet Januadi, now 52, Mr. Obama asked a group of boys whether they wanted to grow up to be president, a soldier or a businessman. A president would own nothing while a soldier would possess weapons and a businessmen would have money, the young Obama explained.

Mr. Januadi and his younger brother, both of whom later joined the Indonesian military, said they wanted to become soldiers. Another boy, a future banker, said he would become a businessman.

“Then Barry said he would become president and order the soldier to guard him and the businessman to use his money to build him something,” Mr. Januadi said.

Some things you never outgrow.

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About Doug Powers

Doug Powers is a writer, editor and commentator covering news of the day from a conservative viewpoint with an occasional shot of irreverence and a blast of snark. Townhall Media editor. MichelleMalkin.com alum. Bowling novice.